Best running headphones

Whether you’re a casual jogger or a marathon veteran, music can be the perfect companion for your workout, and a good beat can help push you to the limit. The best headphones for running and training should have a high stability and not fall out of ears. Sport headphones should also be comfortable, easy to use, and compact enough to carry around your person when you bring them to the gym or ride a bike.

Below are our recommendations for the best sports headphones you can buy in 2019.

Jaybird Tarah Pro

Type : In-ear  Enclosure : Closed-Back  Wireless : Yes  Noise-Cancelling : No  Mic : Yes  Transducer : Dynamic

The best training and running headphones we’ve tested so far are the Jaybird Tarah Pro. They are well made with a comfortable, stable fit. They feature a braided cable and magnetic earphones that snap in for easier cable management. They also have an IPX7 rating, so they should be waterproof, but we do not yet have a test to confirm this. The Tarah Pro are similar to the regular Tarah, but have a significant improvement in their battery. The battery life of the Jaybird Tarah Pro is over 13 hours, which is more than twice the Tarah. Overall, they sound pretty similar, but the Tarah Pro has better treble, which is great if you want to hear more vocal-oriented pop or rock music while training. The Tarah Pro are good for a variety of genres. Their compatibility with the Jaybird MySound app makes them even more versatile, as you can customize their sound at will. Unfortunately, the Jaybird Tarah Pro can not connect to two Bluetooth devices at the same time as the Tarah. They also have a proprietary charging station that is somewhat restrictive. Luckily they have better latency performance, so they should not be too bad if you want to watch videos on the treadmill. Overall, the Jaybird Tarah Pro are very good sports headphones, but some find them a bit expensive. If you do not care about the battery difference, it’s worth checking the regular tarah as well.

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JBL REFLECT MINI 2

Type : In-ear  Enclosure : Closed-Back  Wireless : Yes  Noise-Cancelling : No  Mic : Yes  Transducer : Dynamic

If you find the Jaybird Tarah Pro too expensive, consider the JBL Reflect Mini 2. They are about the same price as the regular Jaybird Tarah, and although they lack the build quality and customization options of the Tarah series, they are the most convenient to use for charging a standard micro USB cable. The Reflect Mini have a sturdy, comfortable fit and sound neat. They have pretty good audio, making them suitable for a range of music genres such as hip-hop, rock, or even audiobooks or podcasts. Unfortunately, the JBL Reflect Mini 2 does not have a companion app. You can not adjust the sound if you prefer a different sound profile. They are also rated IPX5 only, suggesting that they are not as waterproof as the Tarah Pro. That is, they have much better noise isolation than the Tarah Pro and their battery lasts longer than the regular Tarah.

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BEATS STUDIO3 WIRELESS

Type : Over-ear  Enclosure : Closed-Back  Wireless : Yes  Noise-Cancelling : Yes  Mic : Yes  Transducer : Dynamic

If you do not like the seat of In-Ears and prefer over-the-ear headphones for the gym, we recommend the Beats Studio3 Wireless. They are one of the best headphones we tested. They are not as portable or breathable as the Samsung Gear IconX and the Jaybird X3. They are also a bit less stable for strenuous exercise routines. However, they have a comfortable overhead fit that’s tight enough for running on the head, excellent battery life and above-average sound quality for a good bass. The Sennheiser PXC 550 Wireless and the more affordable Sennheiser HD 4.50 BTNC have more features and customizable options thanks to their app support, but are not so comfortable, and the Beats’ excellent quick-charge function is a lifesaver when you’re at it banging the gym and forgetting to charge it overnight.

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Jabra Elite Active 65t

Type : In-ear  Enclosure : Closed-Back  Wireless : Truly Wireless  Noise-Cancelling : No  Mic : Yes  Transducer : Dynamic

If you really prefer wireless earphones for running and exercising, you should get the Jabra Elite Active 65t. They are very wearable and have a dull blue finish that gives them a premium premium feel. They are IP56 rated and should therefore be more resistant to sweat than the non-active Elite 65t model. We do not yet have a test to confirm this. They have a fairly stable fit in the ear, so they should not jump out of the ears during exercise. They have good audio to keep you running during a run, and are also compatible with the Jabra Sound + Mobile app, which gives you access to an EQ and presets to customize the sound to your liking. They are also a great option for use in a crowded gym because they block a lot of noise. Unfortunately they are not the most comfortable in-ears due to their bulky design. On the other hand, they have a battery life of 5 hours, which should be enough for all your training. The included case charges two additional fees and includes some sports-related features in the app.

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SOUNDPEATS TRUEFREE

Type : In-ear  Enclosure : Closed-Back  Wireless : Truly Wireless  Noise-Cancelling : No  Mic : Yes  Transducer : Dynamic

If the Jabra Elite Active 65t is out of your price range, take a look at SoundPeats TrueFree. They are obviously not as well built as the Jabra Elite Active 65t, but still have a very good build quality, especially considering the cost. They are actually more comfortable than the Elite Active 65t and have an even more stable fit. Unfortunately, their sound is rather mediocre, especially in the altitude range. Their bass-heavy sound may be great for fans of House and EDM, but they are not suitable for more vocal-oriented music, especially since their sound with the Jabra Sound + can not be adjusted as in EQ. Your battery will not last so long, but is only a fraction of the price of the Elite Active 65t. It’s worth considering if you like their sound profile and do not want to spend a lot of money on sports headphones.

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Anker SoundBuds Curve

Type : In-ear  Enclosure : Closed-Back  Wireless : Yes  Noise-Cancelling : No  Mic : Yes  Transducer : Dynamic

If you find the Samsung Gear IconX or the Jaybird X3 a little too expensive, you should consider the Anker SoundBuds Curve instead. They’re the best sports headphones we’ve tested in the budget category so far. They are not really wireless like the more expensive Gear IconX, and their build quality, while decent, does not feel as durable as the Jaybird X3 or even the Jaybird Freedom 2. On the top, they sound better and have longer battery life and range than most other wireless in-ear for their price. Thanks to their earhook design, they are stable enough for most exercises. They are comfortable, lightweight, breathable and wearable, making them a great choice for the gym and most physical activities. The tips may occasionally slip out of your ears during intense exercise routines. Overall, however, only a few wireless in-ears can compete with the Anker SoundBuds Curve in this price range.

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JBL ENDURANCE SPRINT

Type : In-ear  Enclosure : Closed-Back  Wireless : Yes  Noise-Cancelling : No  Mic : Yes  Transducer : Dynamic

If you like the earhook design of the Anker SoundBuds Curve, but want a better sounding headset at a great price, get the JBL Endurance Sprint. The sprint does not have a 12-hour battery life like the anchor curve. They also have lesser latency and are less comfortable for most listeners as they tend to be in-ear. But on the top, they have more first-class design and build quality. They also have better balanced sound and a touch-sensitive control scheme that some users prefer over physical keys. Although a touch-sensitive control system is a good match given the budget price, unfortunately it is not as accurate as physical control.

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JBL E45BT

Type : On-ear  Enclosure : Closed-Back  Wireless : Yes  Noise-Cancelling : No  Mic : Yes  Transducer : Dynamic

If you do not like the seat of In-Ears and over-ears are just too bulky, you should take a look at the JBL E45BT. These ears are not as portable or stable as the Anker SoundBuds Curve. On the other hand, they are a reasonably priced and versatile headset that fits tight enough to run stably. They are also much more compact than typical ears, although they are still too cumbersome for more intense exercises. They have decent sound, good battery life and good radio range, and are rounded enough to suit most applications. The Skullcandy Grind are a bit cheaper, sound better and offer a more comfortable option than the JBL. However, they are not so tight on the head that they slip off the ears more easily during training.

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AfterShokz Trekz Air

Type : Bone Conduction  Enclosure : Open-Back  Wireless : Yes  Noise-Cancelling : No  Mic : Yes  Transducer : Bone Conduction

If you’re mostly out in the open and need to watch for traffic, get the AfterShokz Trekz Air. These are not typical wireless sports headphones. They sit on their temples and use the bone conduction to send vibrations so that they feel the bass instead of hearing it. This is why they sound better than we measured because of this feature. They may not sound as good as ordinary wireless earphones, but they should be good enough to keep you busy running and listening to podcasts and audiobooks. They are great for outdoor running because your ears are wide open and ambient noise is not blocked. Runners or cyclists can be aware of the environment at the same time and follow a background course at the same time. They are very comfortable because they do not enter the ear canal and are lightweight. Unfortunately, they are not the most portable headphones because they have an unusual shape that does not work out. The headband is flexible and may fit in large sports shorts, but you can not put it in your jeans pockets like you could with the BeatsX or the Plantronics BackBeat Fit. On the top they are sturdy enough to run and pretty gummed, but technically not waterproof.

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PLANTRONICS BACKBEAT FIT

Type : Earbuds  Enclosure : Semi-Open  Wireless : Yes  Noise-Cancelling : No  Mic : Yes  Transducer : Dynamic

If you like the all-band design of the AfterShokz Trekz Air, but the bone conduction is not very important and would prefer a better sound instead, you should get the Plantronics BackBeat Fit. You can not monitor everything like AfterShokz, but you still have a semi-open design that does not isolate too much noise. These are more typical in-ear headphones, but their design is more flexible and portable, and is also very stable for the sport. However, the in-ear seat may not be so comfortable for everyone, and some reports show that even sweat and water repellency, the headphones can be damaged by sweat alone. Even so, the BackBeat Fit are sizable, sporty-looking headphones that can be a great outdoor option.

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Final prompt

If you want to choose your own, be careful not to get into the details. There are no perfect headphones. Personal tastes, preferences, and where you use your headphones are more important in your choices.